UOregon Digital Arts BFA 2011, opening reception, June 2. White Box Portland

The U Oregon Digital Arts BFA Exhibition, Watch Your Mouth, is composed of 12 artists completing their fifth year degree program experience.  An entire year has been dedicated to the development of their creative process, their conceptual motivations and the production of a vast range of media in an art context.  These artists seek to define meaning and purpose in a complicated world.  They are invested in a critical inquiry into how humankind navigates a complex existence.  This thesis exhibition is the result of mining the abstract space between humans and technology, researching cognitive behavior, dissecting language and information delivery systems, examining our poetic relationships to space and place, investigating material translations, process obsessions, and questioning personal philosophies, all with an often dark, twisted and cryptic sense of humor.  There is a diversity and consistency to the Digital Arts BFA artists’ work.  The range of media and methodologies employed span hybrid digital output, computer programming, image capture, drawing, animation, sculpture and as always, evidence of the skilled hand.  Clearly a mark of the UO Digital Arts experience, the ideas reign importance over the media.  It is the ideas that appear consistent and substantial, for this unique BFA experience.  Like barometers for culture and society-at-large, these artists ask important questions about how and why we live in a technologically fertile, swiftly moving world.  Change, thought, story, space, inquiry, truth, translation, language, communication, digitization, these ideas are consistently mined and dissected from this critical, analytical group of young artists.  It is with their work we attempt to find a better understanding to our place in the universe.The artists are Brian Aebi, Amy Chan, Braeden Cox, Gage Hamilton, Matt Pfliiger, Andrew Pomeroy, Steven Robinson, Brad Saiki, Lauren Seiffert, Tanya Tracy, Chris Wilson and Zach Yarrington.  The UOregon Digital Arts faculty is Colin Ives, Craig Hickman, John Park, Michael Salter, Ying Tan, and Kartz Ucci.  The UOregon Digital Arts BFA Exhibition, Watch Your Mouth, will occupy the White Box exhibition space at the White Stag Building, opening June 2nd 2011.
http://watchyourmouthpdx.com/

The U Oregon Digital Arts BFA Exhibition, Watch Your Mouth, is composed of 12 artists completing their fifth year degree program experience.  An entire year has been dedicated to the development of their creative process, their conceptual motivations and the production of a vast range of media in an art context.  These artists seek to define meaning and purpose in a complicated world.  They are invested in a critical inquiry into how humankind navigates a complex existence.  This thesis exhibition is the result of mining the abstract space between humans and technology, researching cognitive behavior, dissecting language and information delivery systems, examining our poetic relationships to space and place, investigating material translations, process obsessions, and questioning personal philosophies, all with an often dark, twisted and cryptic sense of humor. 

There is a diversity and consistency to the Digital Arts BFA artists’ work.  The range of media and methodologies employed span hybrid digital output, computer programming, image capture, drawing, animation, sculpture and as always, evidence of the skilled hand.  Clearly a mark of the UO Digital Arts experience, the ideas reign importance over the media.  It is the ideas that appear consistent and substantial, for this unique BFA experience.  Like barometers for culture and society-at-large, these artists ask important questions about how and why we live in a technologically fertile, swiftly moving world.  Change, thought, story, space, inquiry, truth, translation, language, communication, digitization, these ideas are consistently mined and dissected from this critical, analytical group of young artists.  It is with their work we attempt to find a better understanding to our place in the universe.

The artists are Brian Aebi, Amy Chan, Braeden Cox, Gage Hamilton, Matt Pfliiger, Andrew Pomeroy, Steven Robinson, Brad Saiki, Lauren Seiffert, Tanya Tracy, Chris Wilson and Zach Yarrington.  The UOregon Digital Arts faculty is Colin Ives, Craig Hickman, John Park, Michael Salter, Ying Tan, and Kartz Ucci.  The UOregon Digital Arts BFA Exhibition, Watch Your Mouth, will occupy the White Box exhibition space at the White Stag Building, opening June 2nd 2011.

http://watchyourmouthpdx.com/

Digital Arts and the Department of Art are proud to present HUNG Keung. HUNG graduated from the Swire School of Design, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design (MA in Film + Video), UK. He was a visiting scholar at the Centre for Art and Media (ZKM), Germany (2001-02). Currently, he is a PhD candidate at The Planetary Collegium, the University of the Arts in Zurich, Switzerland.
In recognition of his international achievement in new media art, HUNG was awarded a prestigious President’s Award (2002); Deutscher Akademicscher Austausch Dienst Scholarship, Germany (2002) and Asian Cultural Council Fellowship, US (2005). In 2004, HUNG founded innov+media lab, focusing on new media art + design research in relation to Chinese philosophy and interactivity.
HUNG KEUNG BLOATED CITY | SKINNY LANGUAGEIn HUNG’s Bloated City | Skinny Language, the viewer appears on two screens surrounded by a myriad of fragmented brush strokes. Characters read the viewer’s outline and aggregate around their body. Responding to the slightest movement, the characters fly gradually from one screen to the next, from one image of the viewer to their mirror image. The artist  prompts viewers to reflect on how they can locate themselves in their universe (Heaven + Earth) and relate to the notions of Dao 道.PUBLIC TALKS + LECTURESApril 5 | Artist Lecture| Harrington Room (Jaqua Center) at 6 pmSponsors: Computer and Information Science, Arts Administration Program
April 6 | Gallery Talk| 240 JSMA at 6 pm. Sponsors: Cinema Pacific + JSMA
April 7 | White Box Opening24 NW1st Avenue, UO White Stag Block, Portland6–8 pm; remarks at 7pm
EXHIBITIONSJSMA: Where To Come From? Where To Go?Video Works by Hung KeungShowing from April 5th to June 19th
White Box: Bloated City | Skinny LanguageShowing from April 5th to May 14thSponsors: University of Oregon Portland ProgramsAdditional support from Ace Hotel

Digital Arts and the Department of Art are proud to present HUNG Keung. HUNG graduated from the Swire School of Design, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design (MA in Film + Video), UK. He was a visiting scholar at the Centre for Art and Media (ZKM), Germany (2001-02). Currently, he is a PhD candidate at The Planetary Collegium, the University of the Arts in Zurich, Switzerland.

In recognition of his international achievement in new media art, HUNG was awarded a prestigious President’s Award (2002); Deutscher Akademicscher Austausch Dienst Scholarship, Germany (2002) and Asian Cultural Council Fellowship, US (2005). In 2004, HUNG founded innov+media lab, focusing on new media art + design research in relation to Chinese philosophy and interactivity.

HUNG KEUNG BLOATED CITY | SKINNY LANGUAGE
In HUNG’s Bloated City | Skinny Language, the viewer appears on two screens surrounded by a myriad of fragmented brush strokes. Characters read the viewer’s outline and aggregate around their body. Responding to the slightest movement, the characters fly gradually from one screen to the next, from one image of the viewer to their mirror image. The artist  prompts viewers to reflect on how they can locate themselves in their universe (Heaven + Earth) and relate to the notions of Dao 道.

PUBLIC TALKS + LECTURES
April 5 | Artist Lecture| Harrington Room (Jaqua Center) at 6 pm
Sponsors: Computer and Information Science, Arts Administration Program

April 6 | Gallery Talk| 240 JSMA at 6 pm. Sponsors: Cinema Pacific + JSMA

April 7 | White Box Opening
24 NW1st Avenue, UO White Stag Block, Portland
6–8 pm; remarks at 7pm

EXHIBITIONS
JSMA: Where To Come From? Where To Go?
Video Works by Hung Keung
Showing from April 5th to June 19th

White Box: Bloated City | Skinny Language
Showing from April 5th to May 14th
Sponsors: University of Oregon Portland Programs
Additional support from Ace Hotel

Studying Motion with New Technology

Members of the 3D Imaging and 3D Animation courses (ARTD 471 & 472) have a new tool at their fingertips. Starting this term, we have a motion capture system set up on our Eugene campus. The technology, most often used for 3D character animation and in the video gaming industry, works by recording 34 points on the human body from 8 different cameras, and at 100 frames per second per camera. Through careful data analysis, each captured segment of motion is then converted from millions of X/Y/Z data into a 3D skeleton. This moving skeleton can be attached to 3D characters that students in the class are making, so the real human motion-capture movement is carried out in a virtual 3D body.


3D student Brett Cicarello suits up for a motion capture session.

Though this technique is heavily used in the entertainment industry, the powerful tool can also be used for creative experimentation and technological re-purposing. For example, can you image the human body as a digital synthesizer? Or could the motion of a body be tethered to something otherwise ephemeral, such as a cloud or a digital sculpture? There are many possibilities and we are ready to explore them.



The 3D skeleton imports into 3D Software (Blender 3D) as a skeleton.

Currently John Park (Digital Arts faculty) is also crating works with this tool on conjunction with dancers and electronic musicians as a way to press the tool usage out of industry and into creative practice. This work is being carried out by the art collective Harmonic Laboratory.

To get a sense of the fluid motion capture, here are some videos of capture sessions:


And another…

 BloomThis interactive piece encourages the viewer to identify unexpected grotesque qualities in video accompanied by audio, which otherwise could be described as beautiful. The tracking system is set up to recognize two figures within the space with infrared light values by the camera positioned above the gallery space. When participants enter the space, those who use their movement controls aspects of the video such as position, volume, and sharpness. Through the rich user experience contributed by visual presentation, the spectator will understand the function of the piece. This interactive video works at a unique intersection of narrative with film and video, music composition, and physical interaction. As a whole, our objective is to combine beautiful and grotesque elements to generate a surreal, interactive experience. 
http://vimeo.com/20537529 
Tech: Interactive media installation using isadora and a IR camera for position tracking  

 Bloom

This interactive piece encourages the viewer to identify unexpected grotesque qualities in video accompanied by audio, which otherwise could be described as beautiful. The tracking system is set up to recognize two figures within the space with infrared light values by the camera positioned above the gallery space. When participants enter the space, those who use their movement controls aspects of the video such as position, volume, and sharpness. Through the rich user experience contributed by visual presentation, the spectator will understand the function of the piece. This interactive video works at a unique intersection of narrative with film and video, music composition, and physical interaction. As a whole, our objective is to combine beautiful and grotesque elements to generate a surreal, interactive experience.

http://vimeo.com/20537529

Tech: Interactive media installation using isadora and a IR camera for position tracking  

Re:Member is an interactive multimedia installation that engages group-user experience. The piece explores the varying degree of perspective in shared memory through the vocabulary of classic home made movie footage and period sound material. This interactive media installation was created in ARTD 410 interactive Video, using the program Isadora and a IR camera for motion tracking.  http://vimeo.com/20314038

Re:Member is an interactive multimedia installation that engages group-user experience. The piece explores the varying degree of perspective in shared memory through the vocabulary of classic home made movie footage and period sound material. This interactive media installation was created in ARTD 410 interactive Video, using the program Isadora and a IR camera for motion tracking.  http://vimeo.com/20314038

OUR MFA’s

The U Oregon Art Department offers an MFA in studio art, though many of the MFA candidates find a certain objectivity or context by aligning themselves with a particular media area.  We currently have 4 MFA candidates who are preparing for their spring thesis exhibition.  Julie Berkbuegler, Jessica Robinson, Josh Wardle and Peter Pazderski all consider the Digital Arts area a program, and philosophy about media, that suits their practice.

here are 4 of our MFA’s website links:

julieberkbuegler.com <http://julieberkbuegler.com>

jesku.com <http://jesku.com>

peter pazderski <http://pazderski.blogspot.com/>

Josh Wardle  http://www.powerlanguage.co.uk/

UO Digital Arts undergraduate student Doug Potts casts a visual landscape onto an experimental sound piece by Intermedia Music Technology Graduate Student Jon Bellona entitled “AND UH UMM”. Potts gracefully walks the fine line between experimental narrative and a visual accessibility in this short piece.

1 of 7 video art profiles of Uoregon Digital Arts personalities; directed, shot, composed and edited by B P Schmidt, 2010

1 of 7 video art profiles of Uoregon Digital Arts personalities; directed, shot, composed and edited by B P Schmidt, 2010